The Arts

The Visual and Performing Arts

The Visual and Performing Arts engage, inspire and enrich us all. They excite the imagination and encourage us to reach our creative and expressive potential.  The Visual and Performing Arts provide opportunities for students to learn how to create, design, represent, communicate and share their imagined and conceptual ideas, emotions, observations and experiences.

The Visual and Performing Arts play a major role in the development and expression of cultures and communities, locally, nationally and globally. Students communicate ideas in current, traditional and emerging forms and use arts knowledge and understanding to make sense of their world.

The Visual and Performing Arts Learning Areas provides students with opportunities to engage with creative industries and arts professionals. Learning in the Arts is based on cognitive, affective and sensory/kinesthetic response to arts practices as students revisit increasingly complex content, skills and processes with developing confidence and sophistication across their years of learning.

The Visual & Performing Arts: Years 7 to 10

The five Arts subjects in the Australian Curriculum are Dance, Drama, Media Arts, Music, and Visual Arts; and students at Carine SHS have the opportunity to study in all of these contexts.

As students move into adolescence, they undergo a range of important physical, cognitive, emotional and social changes. Students often begin to question established conventions, practices and values. Their interests extend well beyond their own communities and they begin to develop concerns about wider issues. Students in this age range increasingly look for and value learning that is perceived to be relevant, is consistent with personal goals, and leads to important outcomes. They are able to work with more abstract concepts and consider complex ideas.

In these years, learning in the Arts enables students to explore and question their own immediate experience and their understanding of the wider world. Learning through and about the Arts enables students to build on their own experiences. Students explore and engage with artworks made by others, as well as performing in Dance, Drama and Music, and/or exhibiting works created in Visual Arts.

The Visual & Performing Arts: Years 11 and 12

A range of Arts courses are available at Carine SHS to provide all young people with the opportunity to develop knowledge, understanding and skills about themselves, their community and the broader world in which they live. As students refine their pathways to life after school, many life skills are accessed through the Visual and Performing Arts including live performances in Dance, Drama and Music; and through exhibitions in Visual Arts. Often these skills learned in the Arts are carried forward into our community. Students at Carine SHS can access ATAR, General or VET courses in Year 11 and 12.

ATAR Courses

Student results in ATAR courses are used by the Tertiary Institutions Service Centre (TISC) to calculate a student’s Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR). The ATAR is used to determine eligibility for university entrance.  The following ATAR Arts courses are offered at Carine SHS:

Year 11 & 12 Drama

Year 11 & 12 Music: Western Arts

Year 11 & 12 Visual Arts

General Courses

These courses are not externally examined. However, they each have an externally set task (EST) which is set by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority. General courses are for students who are typically aiming to enter further vocationally based training and/or the workforce straight from school.  The following General Arts courses are offered at Carine SHS:

Year 11 & 12 Dance

Year 11 & 12 Drama

Year 11 & 12 Music: Contemporary

Year 11 & 12 Visual Arts

DRAMA

DRAMA YR 9 PLAYING WITH DRAMA

This course provides students with experiences in which the intellect, the emotions, the imagination and the body are all involved; and are developed through expression, performance, observation and reflection. This course helps develop drama skills in the areas of voice and movement as well as improvisation and play. Students will develop skills In Voice and Movement; Mime; Improvisation; Play building and Developing character and role.

DRAMA YR 9 CREATING DRAMA

This course provides students with experiences in which the intellect, the emotions, the imagination and the body are all involved; and are developed through expression, performance, observation and reflection. Students will prepare original and scripted performance pieces using a range of Presentational performance styles which they will learn through class workshops. During the semester students will have the opportunity to present a polished, original performance item to an audience.

DRAMA 1 YR 10 EXPLORING THE WORLD OF DRAMA

This course allows students to explore various styles of theatre through practical drama workshops. There will be an application of drama skills through group based assessments. Content covered includes styles such as: Realist theatre, absurd theatre, epic theatre, poor theatre, image theatre and theatre of cruelty. This course is recommended for students interested in upper school drama.

Students develop skills in: Voice and Movement; Characterisation and role; Use of space; Conventions of theatre; Dramatic structures; Language and text.

DRAMA 2 YR 10 LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION

This course allows students to develop their skills in play building, gaining an understanding of narrative structures and stage spaces. Students learn to work collaboratively to produce a performance for an audience.

Students will develop skills in: Voice and Movement; Play-building; Drama techniques and conventions; Collaborative group work; Elements of drama; Audience awareness; Theatre Etiquette.

Year 11 General Drama

Unit 1 – Dramatic storytelling This unit engages students with the skills, techniques and conventions of dramatic storytelling.

Unit 2 – Drama performance events This unit focuses on drama performance events for an audience other than their class members.

Year 11 ATAR Drama

Unit 1 – Representational, realist drama This unit focuses on representational, realistic drama forms and styles. Students explore techniques of characterisation through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Stanislavski and other representational drama.

Unit 2 – Presentational, non‐realist drama This unit focuses on presentational, non‐realist drama. Students explore techniques of role and/or character through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Brecht and other presentational drama

Year 12 General Drama

Unit 3 – Representational, realist drama This unit focuses on representational, realistic drama. Students explore techniques of characterisation through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Stanislavski and others.

Unit 4 – Presentational, non‐realist drama This unit focuses on presentational, non‐realist drama. Students explore techniques of role and/or character through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Brecht and others.

Year 12 ATAR Drama

Unit 3 – Reinterpretation of drama for contemporary audiences This unit focuses on reinterpretation of dramatic text, context, forms and styles for contemporary audiences through applying theoretical and practitioner approaches.

Unit 4 – Contemporary and devised drama This unit focuses on interpreting, manipulating and synthesising a range of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary and devised drama.

DANCE

The Dance course acknowledges the interrelationship between practical and theoretical aspects of dance – the making and performing of movement and the appreciation of its meaning. Through decision-making in individual and group work, students use a wide range of creative processes, such as improvisation and the use of choreographic elements to create dance works. They also learn how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. Through dance, students experience an intrinsic sense of enjoyment and have an opportunity to achieve a high level of movement skills. Examples of genres that may be studied in this course include, but are not limited to: contemporary, ballet, jazz, hip‐hop, tap, ballroom and cultural dance, for example, Spanish, Indian.

Year 9 Dance

Students will learn the basic fundamental dance movement skills and technique for jazz dance, hip-hop and Contemporary Dance. They will be introduced to basic choreographic processes where they will have an opportunity to create, interpret, explore and present dance ideas in performance. Students will also develop an appreciation for dance through reflecting and responding to dance works and research the role of dance in our society. Students will be given an opportunity to perform a dance routine in a concert setting. Jazz and Hip-Hop Dance technique; Improved physical competencies i.e. flexibility, fitness, strength; Performance qualities; Theatre etiquette; Choreographic skills; Knowledge of Dance in our society; Learn a dance routine to perform in a concert setting. The students will work towards a class dance and small group routine and conduct a case study based on a Youth Dance Company.

Year 10 Dance

In this course, students will further develop the basic fundamentals of choreography and be introduced to more complex techniques with greater emphasis on performance and dance as entertainment. Students will continue to develop their technical skills and be consolidating their techniques of Contemporary Dance. Emphasis will be placed on the students’ awareness of dance within our culture and community, researching the origins of Contemporary Dance. Students will be given an opportunity to perform a dance routine in a concert setting. As students progress into second semester they will explore the themes of ‘Individuality, Independence and Originality’. Students will learn how to outline the intention of their dance composition and make artistic choices and key decisions relating to genre, motifs, soundtrack, characterization and structure. They will review a dance performance and perform their dance works to an audience. It is preferable that this course is completed as a Pre-requisite for the Dance ATAR and Dance General courses in Year 11 and 12.

Year 11 & 12 Dance

ATAR Year 11 Dance

Unit 1 – Popular culture

This unit focuses on the exploration of dance in popular culture and how this leads to a wider understanding of the diverse contexts and functions of dance in society.

Unit 2 – Australian dance

This unit focuses on the diverse range of functions and contexts of dance in Australia. Students analyse critically their own cultural beliefs and values in relation to traditional and contemporary dance forms and styles, and develop an understanding of their own dance heritage.

ATAR Year 12 Dance

Unit 3 – Youth voice

This unit focuses on creating dance that explores original concepts and expresses personal ideas. The students will consider how dance reflects and is shaped by society and its values.

Unit 4 – Extending the boundaries

This unit focuses on the development of choreographic ideas to create unique dance work with personal style. The students analyse critically and evaluate the relationships between dance works, audiences and contexts.

General Year 11 Dance

Unit 1 – Exploring the components of dance

In this unit, students explore the elements of dance and processes of choreography, and solve structured choreographic tasks to produce dance works for performance.

Unit 2 – Dance as entertainment

In this unit, students explore the entertainment potential of dance and choreography.

General Year 12 Dance

Unit 3 – Popular culture

This unit focuses on the exploration of dance in popular culture and how this leads to a wider understanding of the diverse contexts and functions of dance in society.

Unit 4 – Australian dance

This unit focuses on the diverse range of functions and contexts of dance in Australia. Students critically analyse their own cultural beliefs and values in relation to traditional and contemporary dance forms and styles, and develop an understanding of their own dance heritage.

MUSIC

Progression from the Year 7–10 Curriculum

Through a study of music, students listen to, compose and perform music, acquiring skills and knowledge with increasing depth and complexity though continuous and sequential learning. Music learning is aurally based, with students learning about and evaluating the role and use of the elements of music through listening, analysing, composing and performing activities. Students develop music literacy skills as they learn to read, write, interpret, create, compose, arrange and perform music, communicating ideas through the use of music symbols, notation, terminology and technology. As musicians, students listen to and experience music as both performers and audience members, developing an increasing awareness of their different roles and expectations. Through practice and performance as soloists or ensemble members, they develop and refine technical skill and control, musical and stylistic interpretation, to reach their creative and expressive potential.

Students learn to compare and evaluate music, expressing personal preferences, differentiating between subjective and objective responses, and providing strategies to inform and improve music making. They explore music from a broad range of contexts, times and cultures, using critical analysis and research to evaluate the influence of social, cultural and historical factors on musical developments developing aesthetic knowledge /understanding and respect for different music practices and traditions.

Yr 11 & 12 ATAR Music

Music is an aural art form that involves the exploration, organisation and manipulation of sound and silence. Music has the capacity to engage, inspire and enrich students, stimulating imaginative and innovative responses and fostering critical thinking and aesthetic understanding. Students listen, perform, improvise, compose and analyse music, developing skills to confidently engage with a diverse array of musical experiences both independently and collaboratively. Through continuous sequential music learning, students develop music knowledge, skills and understanding to create, communicate and evaluate music ideas with increasing depth and complexity. Students are encouraged to reach their creative and expressive potential, communicating ideas with current and emerging technologies.

Music is an expression of human experience and has a universal place in every culture across the globe and throughout history. Studying music provides the basis for significant lifelong engagement and enjoyment, and fosters understanding and respect for all music and music practices across different times, places, cultures and contexts.

The Music ATAR course encourages students to explore a range of musical experiences through a choice of different musical contexts. The course consists of a written component and a practical component, incorporating the following content areas:

Aural and Theory
Composition and Arrangement
Cultural and Historical Analysis
Performance

Students can choose to perform on voice or instrument in a choice of four contexts:

Western Art Music, Jazz, Contemporary Music, Music Theatre and/or submit a composition portfolio to fulfil the requirements of the practical component.

Visual Art

“Every child is an artist” – Picasso

Absolutely fabulous artwork is produced at Carine. Students benefit from programmes that are concept initiated, to allow broad and individual responses.

Students are assessed across the four areas listed below:

  • Arts ideas – Explore and develop ideas and find solutions to tasks. Be prepared to draw on the concepts of other artists and cultures.
  • Arts skills and processes – Combine a variety of skills to develop specific styles in practical pieces.
  • Arts responses – Through the use of art language; describe, analyse and express informed opinions about art works.
  • Arts in society – Understand the key features of artists, their works and contexts, demonstrating links to the development of practical pieces.
  • Specific Course Details are located in the Course Handbooks

“Communication with others strengthens Creativity and Understanding”

The best ideas are usually the ones that come from careful development. Students inquire through research into other artists’ practices, discuss their directions with staff and build on the creative process through investigation and consultation.

“The ability to make original and independent decisions is valued.”

Responsible, safe and economic use of art materials is intrinsic to best work practice.