English

  • Years 7 to 10 English

Overview

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. These strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years.

Year 7

In Year 7 students communicate with a range of individuals and groups in a range of environments. They experience learning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts that relate to the school curriculum, local community, regional and global contexts. Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view, interpret, evaluate and perform a range of spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. Students develop their understanding of how texts, including media texts, are influenced by context, purpose and audience.

Literary texts that support and extend students in Year 7 as independent readers are drawn from a range of realistic, fantasy, speculative fiction and historical genres and involve some challenging and unpredictable plot sequences and a range of non-stereotypical characters. These texts explore themes of interpersonal relationships and ethical dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings and represent a variety of perspectives. Informative texts present technical and content information from various sources about specialised topics. Text structures are more complex including chapters, headings and subheadings, tables of contents, indexes and glossaries. Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts such as narratives, procedures, performances, reports and discussions, and are beginning to create literary analyses and transformations of texts.

Year 8

Year 8 English students consolidate and expand on skills and understandings gained in Year 7. They continue to interact with peers, teachers, individuals, groups and community members in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments. They also experience learning in both familiar and unfamiliar contexts that relate to the school curriculum, local community, regional and global contexts.

Year 8 students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view, interpret, evaluate and perform a range of spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These include various types of media texts including newspapers, magazines and digital texts, early adolescent novels, non-fiction, poetry and dramatic performances. Students develop their understanding of how texts, including media texts, are influenced by context, purpose and audience.

Year 9

Literary texts that support and extend students in Year 9 as independent readers are drawn from a range of genres and involve complex, challenging and unpredictable plot sequences and hybrid structures that may serve multiple purposes. These texts explore themes of human experience and cultural significance, interpersonal relationships, and ethical and global dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings and represent a variety of perspectives. Informative texts represent a synthesis of technical and abstract information about a wide range of specialised topics. Text structures are more complex and language features include successive complex sentences with embedded clauses, a high proportion of unfamiliar and technical vocabulary, figurative and rhetorical language, and dense information supported by various types of graphics presented in visual form.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, discussions, literary analyses, transformations of texts and reviews.

Year 10

Continuing from Year 9 English students become increasingly independent readers who choose from a range of genres and involve complex, challenging and unpredictable plot sequences and hybrid structures that may serve multiple purposes. These texts explore themes of human experience and cultural significance, interpersonal relationships, and ethical and global dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings and represent a variety of perspectives. Informative texts represent a synthesis of technical and abstract information about a wide range of specialised topics. Text structures are more complex including chapters, headings and subheadings, tables of contents, indexes and glossaries. Language features include successive complex sentences with embedded clauses, a high proportion of unfamiliar and technical vocabulary, figurative and rhetorical language, and dense information supported by various types of graphics presented in visual form.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, discussions, literary analyses, transformations of texts and reviews.

Year 11 English Courses

Year 11 ATAR English

The English ATAR course focuses on developing students’ analytical, creative, and critical thinking and communication skills in all language modes. It encourages students to critically engage with texts from their contemporary world, with texts from the past and with texts from Australian and other cultures. Such engagement helps students develop a sense of themselves, their world and their place in it.

Through close study and wide reading, viewing and listening, students develop the ability to analyse and evaluate the purpose, stylistic qualities and conventions of texts and enjoy creating their own imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses. The English ATAR course is designed to develop students’ facility with all types of texts and language modes and to foster an appreciation of the value of English for lifelong learning.

Students refine their skills across all language modes by engaging critically and creatively with texts. They learn to speak and write fluently in a range of contexts and to create a range of text forms. They hone their oral communication skills through discussion, debate and argument, in a range of formal and informal situations.

Syllabus

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration.

Unit 1

In this unit students explore how meaning is communicated through the relationships between language, text, purpose, context and audience. This includes how language and texts are shaped by their purpose, the audiences for whom they are intended, and the contexts in which they are created and received. Through responding to and creating texts, students consider how language, structure and conventions operate in a variety of imaginative, interpretive and persuasive texts. Study in this unit focuses on the similarities and differences between texts and how visual elements combine with spoken and written elements to create meaning. Students develop an understanding of stylistic features and apply skills of analysis and creativity. They are able to respond to texts in a variety of ways, creating their own texts, and reflecting on their own learning.

Unit 2 

Students analyse the representation of ideas, attitudes and voices in texts to consider how texts represent the world and human experience. Analysis of how language and structural choices shape perspectives in and for a range of contexts is central to this unit. By responding to and creating texts in different modes and media, students consider the interplay of imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical elements in a range of texts and present their own analyses. Students critically examine the effect of stylistic choices and the ways in which these choices position audiences for particular purposes, revealing and/or shaping attitudes, values and perspectives. Through the creation of their own texts, students are encouraged to reflect on their language choices and consider why they have represented ideas in particular ways.

Year 11 General English

General courses are not externally examined. However, they each have an externally set task (EST) which is set by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority. General courses are for students who are typically aiming to enter further vocationally based training or the workforce straight from school.

General English focuses on consolidating and refining the skills and knowledge needed by students to become competent, confident and engaged users of English in everyday, community, social, further education, training and workplace contexts. The course is designed to provide students with the skills that will empower them to succeed in a wide range of post-secondary pathways.

Syllabus

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration.

Unit 1

Unit 1 focuses on students comprehending and responding to the ideas and information presented in texts.

Students:

  • employ a variety of strategies to assist comprehension
  • read, view and listen to texts to connect, interpret and visualise ideas
  • learn how to respond personally and logically to texts by questioning, using inferential reasoning and determining the importance of content and structure
  • consider how organisational features of texts help the audience to understand the text
  • learn to interact with others in a range of contexts, including everyday, community, social, further education, training and workplace contexts
  • communicate ideas and information clearly and correctly in a range of contexts
  • apply their understanding of language through the creation of texts for different purposes.

Unit 2 

Unit 2 focuses on interpreting ideas and arguments in a range of texts and contexts.

Students:

  • analyse text structures and language features and identify the ideas, arguments and values expressed
  • consider the purposes and possible audiences of texts
  • examine the connections between purpose and structure and how a text’s meaning is influenced by the context in which it is created and received
  • integrate relevant information and ideas from texts to develop their own interpretations
  • learn to interact effectively in a range of contexts
  • create texts using persuasive, visual and literary techniques to engage audiences in a range of modes and media.

Year 11 ATAR Literature

The Literature ATAR course focuses on the study of literary texts and developing students as independent, innovative and creative learners and thinkers who appreciate the aesthetic use of language; evaluate perspectives and evidence; and challenge ideas and interpretations. The Literature ATAR course explores how literary texts construct representations, shape perceptions of the world and enable us to enter other worlds of the imagination. In this subject, students actively participate in the dialogue of literary analysis and the creation of imaginative and analytical texts in a range of modes, media and forms.

Students enjoy and respond creatively and critically to literary texts drawn from the past and present and from Australian and other cultures. They reflect on what these texts offer them as individuals, as members of Australian society and as world citizens.

Students establish and articulate their views through creative response and logical argument. They reflect on qualities of literary texts, appreciate the power of language and inquire into the relationships between texts, authors, readers, audiences and contexts as they explore ideas, concepts, attitudes and values.

Year 12 English Courses

Year 12 ATAR English

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair, each of one semester duration.

The English ATAR course focuses on developing students’ analytical, creative, and critical thinking and communication skills in all language modes. It encourages students to critically engage with texts from their contemporary world, with texts from the past and with texts from Australian and other cultures. Such engagement helps students develop a sense of themselves, their world and their place in it.

Through close study and wide reading, viewing and listening, students develop the ability to analyse and evaluate the purpose, stylistic qualities and conventions of texts and enjoy creating their own imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses. The English ATAR course is designed to develop students’ facility with all types of texts and language modes and to foster an appreciation of the value of English for lifelong learning. Students refine their skills across all language modes by engaging critically and creatively with texts. They learn to speak and write fluently in a range of contexts and to create a range of text forms. They hone their oral communication skills through discussion, debate and argument, in a range of formal and informal situations.

Unit 3

Students explore representations of themes, issues, ideas and concepts through a comparison of texts. They analyse and compare the relationships between language, genre and contexts, comparing texts within and/or across different genres and modes. Students recognise and analyse the conventions of genre in texts and consider how those conventions may assist interpretation. Students compare and evaluate the effect of different media, forms and modes on the structure of texts and how audiences respond to them. Understanding of these concepts is demonstrated through the creation of imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses.

Unit description

Students explore representations of themes, issues, ideas and concepts through a comparison of texts. They analyse and compare the relationships between language, genre and contexts, comparing texts within and/or across different genres and modes. Students recognise and analyse the conventions of genre in texts and consider how those conventions may assist interpretation. Students compare and evaluate the effect of different media, forms and modes on the structure of texts and how audiences respond to them. Understanding of these concepts is demonstrated through the creation of imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit, students:

  • understand relationships between texts, audiences, purposes, genres and contexts
  • investigate the effects of different conventions and media on responses
  • create oral, written and multimodal texts in a range of media and styles.

Unit content

An understanding of the English ATAR Year 11 content is assumed knowledge for students in Year 12. It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 and Unit 4 have completed Unit 1 and Unit 2.

This unit includes the knowledge, understandings and skills described below. This is the examinable content.

Compare texts from similar or different genres and contexts by:

  • analysing language, structural and stylistic choices
  • explaining how each text conforms to or challenges the conventions of particular genres or modes
  • analysing and evaluating how similar themes, issues, ideas and concepts are treated in different texts.

Compare and contrast distinctive features of genres by:

  • analysing the techniques and conventions used in different genres, media and modes
  • considering how the conventions of genres can be challenged, manipulated or subverted
  • examining how genres and their conventions have changed and been adapted over time.

Analyse and critically appraise how the conventions of texts influence responses, including:

  • the ways language patterns can create shades of meaning
  • how expectations of genres have developed and the effect when those expectations are met or not met, extended or subverted
  • how responses to texts and genres may change over time and in different cultural contexts
  • the role of the audience in making meaning.

Create a range of texts:

  • transforming and adapting texts for different purposes, contexts and audiences
  • making innovative and imaginative use of language features
  • using and experimenting with text structures and language features related to specific genres for particular effects
  • sustaining analysis and argument
  • using appropriate quotation and referencing protocols
  • using strategies for planning, drafting, editing and proofreading
  • using accurate spelling, punctuation, syntax and metalanguage.

Reflect on their own and others’ texts by:

  • analysing and evaluating how different texts represent similar ideas in different ways
  • explaining how meaning changes when texts are transformed into a different genre or medium
  • comparing and evaluating the impact of language conventions used in a variety of texts and genres.

Unit 4

Students examine different interpretations and perspectives to develop further their knowledge and analysis of purpose and style. They challenge perspectives, values and attitudes in texts, developing and testing their own interpretations through debate and argument. Through close study of texts, students explore relationships between content and structure, voice and perspectives and the text and context. This provides the opportunity for students to extend their experience of language and of texts and explore their ideas through their own reading and viewing. Students demonstrate understanding of the texts studied through creation of imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses.
Unit description
Students examine different interpretations and perspectives to develop further their knowledge and analysis of purpose and style. They challenge perspectives, values and attitudes in texts, developing and testing their own interpretations through debate and argument. Through close study of texts, students explore relationships between content and structure, voice and perspectives and the text and context. This provides the opportunity for students to extend their experience of language and of texts and explore their ideas through their own reading and viewing. Students demonstrate understanding of the texts studied through creation of imaginative, interpretive, persuasive and analytical responses.
Learning outcomes
By the end of this unit, students:

  • understand how content, structure, voice and perspectives in texts shape responses and interpretations
  • examine different interpretations of texts and how these resonate with, or challenge, their own responses
  • create oral, written and multimodal texts in a range of forms, media and styles.

Unit content
This unit builds on the content covered in Unit 3.

This unit includes the knowledge, understandings and skills described below. This is the examinable content.

Investigate and evaluate the relationships between texts and contexts by:

  • undertaking close analysis of texts
  • examining how each text relates to a particular context or contexts
  • comparing the contexts in which texts are created and received.

Evaluate different perspectives, attitudes and values represented in texts by:

  • analysing content, purpose and choice of language
  • analysing the use of voice and point of view
  • exploring other interpretations and aspects of context to develop a considered response.

Evaluate how texts offer perspectives through:

  • the selection of mode, medium, genre and type of text
  • the ways points of view and values are represented
  • the selection of language features that generate empathy or controversy.

Create a range of texts:

  • using appropriate language and stylistic features to sustain a personal voice and perspective
  • using nuanced language
  • synthesising ideas and opinions to develop complex argument
  • substantiating and justifying their own responses using textual evidence
  • using appropriate quotation and referencing protocols
  • using strategies for planning, drafting, editing and proofreading
  • using accurate spelling, punctuation, syntax and metalanguage.

Reflect on their own and others’ texts by:

  • analysing and evaluating how different attitudes and perspectives underpin texts
  • questioning the assumptions and values in texts
  • identifying omissions, inclusions, emphases and marginalisations
  • discussing and evaluating different readings of texts. 

Year 12 General English

The English General course focuses on consolidating and refining the skills and knowledge needed by students to become competent, confident and engaged users of English in everyday, community, social, further education, training and workplace contexts. The English General course is designed to provide students with the skills that will empower them to succeed in a wide range of post-secondary pathways. The course develops students’ language, literacy and literary skills to enable them to communicate successfully both orally and in writing and to enjoy and value using language for both imaginative and practical purposes. Students comprehend, analyse, interpret and evaluate the content, structure and style of a wide variety of oral, written, multimodal, digital and media texts. Students learn how the interaction of structure, language, audience and context helps to shape how the audience makes meaning. Both independently and collaboratively, they apply their knowledge to create analytical, imaginative, interpretive and persuasive texts in different modes and media.
Unit 3
Unit 3 focuses on exploring different perspectives presented in a range of texts and contexts. Students:

  • explore attitudes, text structures and language features to understand a text’s meaning and purpose
  • examine relationships between context, purpose and audience in different language modes and types of texts, and their impact on meaning
  • consider how perspectives and values are presented in texts to influence specific audiences
  • develop and justify their own interpretations when responding to texts
  • learn how to communicate logically, persuasively and imaginatively in different contexts, for different purposes, using a variety of types of texts.

Unit description
Unit 3 focuses on exploring different perspectives presented in a range of texts and contexts.

Students:

  • explore attitudes, text structures and language features to understand a text’s meaning and purpose
  • examine relationships between context, purpose and audience in different language modes and types of texts, and their impact on meaning
  • consider how perspectives and values are presented in texts to influence specific audiences
  • develop and justify their own interpretations when responding to texts
  • learn how to communicate logically, persuasively and imaginatively in different contexts, for different purposes, using a variety of types of texts.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit, students:

  • examine the ways that perspectives are presented in literary, everyday and workplace texts
  • understand how language choices influence specific audiences
  • create oral, written and multimodal texts that convey a perspective.

Unit content
An understanding of the English General Year 11 course is assumed knowledge for students in Year 12. It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 and Unit 4 have completed Unit 1 and Unit 2.

This unit includes the knowledge, understandings and skills described below.
Use strategies and skills for comprehending texts, including:

  • applying different reading strategies (such as reviewing, skimming, and scanning) according to the nature of the task, gaining a broad overview, reading for specific details, identifying what the reader already knows about the topic
  • distinguishing different perspectives about the main ideas in texts
  • identifying facts, opinions, supporting evidence and bias
  • understanding the way attitudes and values are presented
  • explaining shifts in tone and perspectives and identifying the effect of language choices on an audience.

Consider how different perspectives and values are presented in texts, including:

  • the relationships between context, purpose, and audience in literary, everyday and workplace texts
  • the use of media, types of texts, text structures and language features, for example, the selective use of fact, evidence and opinion in newspaper reports, the use of statistics and graphs in advertisements, choice of colour and font style in websites and use of questioning strategies and tone of voice in interviews
  • the use of narrative techniques, for example, characterisation and narrative point of view.

Use information for specific purposes and contexts by:

  • gathering different viewpoints, for example, through interviews, surveys, questionnaires, library and/or internet resources
  • categorising and integrating ideas and evidence about specific issues
  • employing ethical research practices such as acknowledging sources, and avoiding plagiarism and collusion.

Create a range of texts by:

  • using appropriate vocabulary, spelling and sentence structures
  • using personal voice and adopting different points of view and/or perspectives to influence audiences in a range of media
  • selecting text structures, language features, and visual techniques to communicate and present ideas and information for different contexts and purposes
  • using strategies for planning, drafting, revising, editing and proofreading, and appropriate referencing.

Communicating and interacting with others:

  • speaking clearly and coherently about ideas, opinions and personal experiences in a range of oral contexts
  • planning and carrying out projects in small groups, sharing tasks and responsibilities, for example, collaborating using email and discussion forums
  • listening actively; being prepared to assert personal views
  • applying critical thinking and problem solving cooperatively.

Unit 4

Unit 4 focuses on community, local or global issues and ideas presented in texts and on developing students’ reasoned responses to them. Students:

  • explore how ideas, attitudes and values are presented by synthesising information from a range of sources to develop independent perspectives
  • analyse the ways in which authors influence and position audiences
  • investigate differing perspectives and develop reasoned responses to these in a range of text forms for a variety of audiences
  • construct and clearly express coherent, logical and sustained arguments and demonstrate an understanding of purpose, audience and context
  • consider intended purpose and audience response when creating their own persuasive, analytical, imaginative, and interpretive texts.

Unit description
Unit 4 focuses on community, local or global issues and ideas presented in texts and on developing students’ reasoned responses to them.

Students:

  • explore how ideas, attitudes and values are presented by synthesising information from a range of sources to develop independent perspectives
  • analyse the ways in which authors influence and position audiences
  • investigate differing perspectives and develop reasoned responses to these in a range of text forms for a variety of audiences
  • construct and clearly express coherent, logical and sustained arguments and demonstrate an understanding of purpose, audience and context
  • consider intended purpose and audience response when creating their own persuasive, analytical, imaginative, and interpretive texts.

Learning outcomes
By the end of this unit, students:

  • investigate the way language is used to present issues and attitudes
  • understand ways in which language is used to influence and engage different audiences
  • create oral, written and multimodal texts that communicate ideas and perspectives on issues and events.

Unit content
This unit builds on the content covered in Unit 3.

This unit includes the knowledge, understandings and skills described below.
Use strategies and skills for comprehending texts, including:

  • analysing issues and ideas in texts and explaining perspectives and implications
  • evaluating the evidence upon which different views are based
  • explaining how texts use language to appeal to the beliefs, attitudes and values of an audience
  • discuss the way ideas and information are presented in texts.

Consider how attitudes and assumptions are presented in texts, including:

  • community, local or global issues in literary, everyday and workplace texts
  • the use of media, types of texts, text structures and language features
  • how some perspectives are privileged while others are marginalised or silenced.

Use information for specific purposes and contexts by:

  • determining the relevance of source material to the context and topic
  • investigating and synthesising ideas and collating appropriate information from a range of source material
  • employing ethical research practices such as acknowledging sources, and avoiding plagiarism and collusion.

Create a range of texts:

  • using appropriate vocabulary, spelling and sentence structures
  • expressing a logical point of view about an idea, issue or event in a range of media and digital technologies
  • integrating text structures, language features and visual techniques to engage and persuade audiences, for example, creating a multimedia advertising campaign, presenting a slideshow presentation, writing and illustrating a picture book and recording a radio talkback program
  • using editing processes and appropriate referencing
  • using and adapting text structures and language features to communicate ideas in a range of media.

Communicating and interacting with others:

  • creating oral texts that communicate ideas and perspectives
  • recognising when to work with others and when to work independently
  • using the language of negotiation, problem solving and conflict resolution.

Year 12 ATAR Literature

The Literature ATAR course focuses on the study of literary texts and developing students as independent, innovative and creative learners and thinkers who appreciate the aesthetic use of language; evaluate perspectives and evidence; and challenge ideas and interpretations. The Literature ATAR course explores how literary texts construct representations, shape perceptions of the world and enable us to enter other worlds of the imagination. In this subject, students actively participate in the dialogue of literary analysis and the creation of imaginative and analytical texts in a range of modes, media and forms. Students enjoy and respond creatively and critically to literary texts drawn from the past and present and from Australian and other cultures. They reflect on what these texts offer them as individuals, as members of Australian society and as world citizens. Students establish and articulate their views through creative response and logical argument. They reflect on qualities of literary texts, appreciate the power of language and inquire into the relationships between texts, authors, readers, audiences and contexts as they explore ideas, concepts, attitudes and values.

Unit 3

Unit 3 develops students’ knowledge and understanding of the relationship between language, culture and identity in literary texts. Students inquire into the power of language to represent ideas, events and people, comparing these across a range of texts, contexts, modes and forms. Through critical analysis and evaluation, the values and attitudes represented in and through texts and their impact on the reader are examined. Throughout the unit, students create analytical responses that are characterised by a confident, engaging style and informed observation. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with language, adapt forms and challenge conventions and ideas.
Unit description
Unit 3 develops students’ knowledge and understanding of the relationship between language, culture and identity in literary texts. Students inquire into the power of language to represent ideas, events and people, comparing these across a range of texts, contexts, modes and forms. Through critical analysis and evaluation, the values and attitudes represented in and through texts and their impact on the reader are examined. Throughout the unit, students create analytical responses that are characterised by a confident, engaging style and informed observation. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with language, adapt forms, and challenge conventions and ideas.
Learning outcomes
By the end of this unit, students:

  • understand the relationship between language and representations of culture and identity
  • develop their own analytical responses by synthesising and/or challenging other interpretations
  • create oral and/or written and/or multimodal texts that experiment with literary style.

Unit content
An understanding of the Year 11 content is assumed knowledge for students in Year 12. It is recommended that students studying Unit 3 and Unit 4 have completed Unit 1 and Unit 2. It should be noted that Unit 3 and Unit 4 are underpinned by the understandings of the content of Unit 1 and Unit 2; candidates are therefore advised that terminology used in Unit 1 and Unit 2 may be used in Year 12 Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE) examination questions.

This unit includes the knowledge, understandings and skills described below. This is the examinable content.

Evaluate the ways in which literary texts represent culture and identity, including:

  • how readers are influenced to respond to their own and others’ cultural experiences
  • the power of language to represent ideas, events and people in particular ways, understanding that language is a cultural medium and that its meanings may vary according to context
  • how representations of culture support or challenge various ideologies. Representations may reinforce habitual ways of thinking about the world or they may challenge popular ways of thinking, and in doing so, reshape values, attitudes and beliefs
  • the ways in which authors represent Australian culture, place and identity both to Australians and the wider world.

Evaluate and reflect on how representations of culture and identity vary in different texts and forms of texts, including:

  • the ways in which representations of the past allow a nation or culture to recognise itself
  • how representations vary according to the discourse. Different groups of people use different terms to represent their ideas about the world and these different discourses (ways or thinking and speaking) offer particular representations of the world
  • the impact of the use of literary conventions and stylistic techniques
  • the ways in which language, structural and stylistic choices communicate values and attitudes and shed new light on familiar ideas
  • how reading intertextually helps readers to understand and critique representations
  • the influence of the reader’s context, cultural assumptions, social position and gender.

Create analytical texts, including:

  • developing independent interpretations of texts supported by informed observation and close textual analysis. In responding to a literary text, readers might consider the context of the writer, the society and culture in which the text was produced, the readers’ contexts and reading strategies or practices, their experiences of reading and their ways of thinking about the world
  • using appropriate linguistic, stylistic and critical terminology to analyse and evaluate texts
  • evaluating their own and others’ ideas and readings using logic and evidence
  • experimenting with different modes, media and forms.

Create imaginative texts, including:

  • experimenting with content, form, style, language and medium. Writers may manipulate grammatical and stylistic elements for ideological and/or aesthetic purposes
  • drawing on knowledge and experience of genre, literary devices and the interplay of the visual and verbal in creating new texts
  • adapting literary conventions for specific audiences, challenging conventions and reinterpreting ideas and perspectives
  • reflecting on the different ways in which form, personal style, language and content engage and position the audience.

Unit 4

Unit 4 develops students’ appreciation of the significance of literary study through close critical analysis of literary texts drawn from a range of forms, genres and styles. Students reflect upon the creative use of language, and the structural and stylistic features that shape meaning and influence response. The unit focuses on the dynamic nature of literary interpretation and considers the insights texts offer, their use of literary conventions and aesthetic appeal. Analytical responses demonstrate increasing independence in interpreting texts and synthesising a range of perspectives into critical and imaginative responses. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with literary conventions and reflect on how the created text takes into account the expectations of audiences.
Unit description
Unit 4 develops students’ appreciation of the significance of literary study through close critical analysis of literary texts drawn from a range of forms, genres and styles. Students reflect upon the creative use of language, and the structural and stylistic features that shape meaning and influence response. The unit focuses on the dynamic nature of literary interpretation and considers the insights texts offer, their use of literary conventions and aesthetic appeal. Students’ analytical responses demonstrate increasing independence in interpreting texts and synthesising a range of perspectives into critical and imaginative responses. In creating imaginative texts, students experiment with literary conventions and reflect on how the created text takes into account the expectations of audiences.
Learning outcomes
By the end of this unit, students:

  • understand the relationship between the representation of values and ideas in texts and how they are received by audiences
  • justify their own critical interpretation or reading of a text
  • create oral and/or written and/or multimodal texts blending and borrowing literary conventions.

Unit content
This unit builds on the content covered in Unit 3.

This unit includes the knowledge, understandings and skills described below. This is the examinable content.

Evaluate the dynamic relationship between authors, texts, audiences and contexts, including:

  • how literature represents and/or reflects cultural change and difference
  • the ways in which the expectations and values of audiences shape readings of texts and perceptions of their significance; and how the social, cultural and historical spaces in which texts are produced and read mediate readings
  • how texts in different literary forms, media or traditions are similar or different
  • how interpretations of texts vary over time
  • the ways in which ideological perspectives are conveyed through texts drawn from other times and cultures, and how these perspectives may be reviewed by a contemporary Australian audience.

Evaluate and reflect on the ways in which literary texts can be interpreted, including:

  • how ideas, values and assumptions are conveyed, that is, how the ideas represented in a text are just one possible way of thinking about the world and may reflect a particular set of values and attitudes. Some literary texts reflect the system of attitudes, values, beliefs and assumptions (ideology) of powerful groups. In this way, literary texts may be used to ‘naturalise’ particular ways of thinking, to serve the purposes of these powerful groups, while marginalising the views of other less powerful groups
  • how specific literary elements and forms shape meaning and influence responses. Genres may have social, ideological and aesthetic functions. Writers may blend and borrow conventions from other genres to appeal to particular audiences
  • how genre, conventions and language contribute to interpretations of texts. Choice of language is related to ideological and aesthetic considerations
  • exploring a range of critical interpretations produced by adopting a variety of reading strategies. Multiple readings of a text are possible.

Create analytical texts, including:

  • developing a creative, informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis
  • using appropriate linguistic, stylistic and critical terminology to evaluate and justify interpretations of texts
  • critically evaluating their own and others’ justifications, evidence and interpretations/readings
  • experimenting with different modes, media and forms.

Create imaginative texts, including:

  • adapting medium, form, style, point of view and language
  • experimenting with elements of style and voice to achieve specific effects
  • manipulating literary conventions for different audiences and contexts
  • reflecting on the ways in which the expectations and values of audiences might shape the created text.